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Welcome To Our Lincoln Middle



School Counseling Site:

Middle School Counseling:
Today's young people are living in an exciting time, with an increasingly diverse society, new technologies, and expanding opportunities. To help ensure that they are prepared to become the next generation of parents, workers, leaders, and citizens, every student needs support, guidance, and opportunities during adolescence, a time of rapid growth and change. Early adolescents face unique and diverse challenges, both personally and developmentally, that have an impact on academic achievement.
 
Middle School Students' Developmental Needs:
Middle school is an exciting, yet challenging time for students, their parents and teachers. During this passage from childhood to adolescence, middle school students are characterized by a need to explore a variety of interests, connecting their learning in the classroom to its practical application in life and work; high levels of activity coupled with frequent fatigue due to rapid growth; a search for their own unique identity as they begin turning more frequently to peers, rather than parents for ideas and affirmation; extreme sensitivity to the comments from others; and heavy reliance on friends to provide comfort, understanding and approval.
 
What changes in middle school?
  • Teams
  • Schedules
  • Variety of course offerings
  • The next level of instructional challenge
  • Increase in homework
  • Change in friendships
  • Locker stress
  • Hormonal chaos
 
As the Lincoln Middle School Counselor, I believe:
  • Every student can be successful in our school.
  • It is the right of each student to have access to a safe and appropriate education.
  • Each child is an individual learner and has individual needs.
  • Student growth is facilitated by supportive counseling.
  • Students become well-rounded, contributing members of society by being offered developmentally appropriate opportunities to gain self-awareness and to enhance the ability for planning their futures.
 
Mission Statement:
The mission of the Lincoln Middle School Counseling Department is to prepare all students to problem solve effectively, to pro-actively plan for their futures, and to be successful, safe, and healthy both in and out of school. The Lincoln Middle School Counseling Department is committed to working collaboratively with all stakeholders (parents, families, teachers, administration, community) to foster a student's academic, career, and personal/social success.
 
The Lincoln Middle School Counseling Team Goal:
Promote academic success by working cooperatively with students, parents, teachers, staff, and the community. We embrace the diversity of our students and advocate for equity, access, and success for all students.
 
Our Lincoln Middle School Counseling Office is a place where students feel comfortable and engaged. I work hard to ensure that all students feel they have a place to go for guidance both inside and outside of the classroom. I am delighted to help students prepare for high school. 
 
If you have any questions or concerns, parents are always welcome to contact me over the phone, email or schedule an appointment. Parents are welcome to drop-in, but appointments are strongly recommended so 100% of the focus is towards your concerns.
 
Students are welcome to make arrangements to see me before or after school.
 
Linda Malone
 
Mrs. Linda Malone, Ed.S
Lincoln Middle School Counselor
350 Monroe Avenue
Green River, WY 82935
Office: Room 214
Phone: (307)-872-4455
Fax: (307)-872-4477
 
Dear Students,
I believe in you.
I trust in you.
You are listened to.
You are cared for.  
You are important.
You will succeed.
 
Love,
 
Mrs. Malone
Student Plan for Success: 
Success is not a happy accident-it takes careful planning and preparation. We work with students to develop goals and map the path to make these goals a reality. Start here on your road to success.
 
Access the Lincoln Middle School Student Handbook on the school district website.
 
What Can I Do?
Ever wonder what you can be doing to prepare for college? Actually, a lot. But, it's not as hard or intimidating as you think.
 
Solid Academic Foundation
The first step in fulfilling your college dream is laying a good academic foundation. What you learn in middle school will make a huge difference in which classes you're able to take (and excel at) in high school. 
 
Read
Read, read, read. You'll be amazed what reading will do for your vocabulary and writing skills. Good essay writing is essential to garnering scholarships. Read everything from books to news articles and blogs; play word games; and make sure you have (and are using) a library card.
 
Extracurricular Activities
Additionally, start working on extracurricular activities. Colleges love to welcome well-rounded students. Students, who volunteer, intern, and/or can show achievement through sports and hobbies usually are the first to land big scholarships. Middle school is a time of exploration. And rightly so. Explore new interests and discover hidden talents; but remember to keep this aspect of life in balance. it is much easier to manage involvement (and carry it through) in one or two activities than to enter high school committed to dozens.
 
As middle school counselor, I perform the following roles in order to promote positive development in academic, career, and personal/social domains:
 
  • Individual counseling
  • Small group counseling
  • Classroom guidance (i.e. Large group counseling)
  • Attend and participate in academic intervention meetings
  • Observe students in various school environments
  • Consult and collaborate with students, parents, teachers, administrators, and other professionals
  • Respond to school crises or emergency situations
  • Provide information and resources to parents on a variety of issues. Please take a moment to browse through the site to learn about opportunities to help your student.
 
 
School Counselors are...
C  Caring
O  Open-minded
U  Understanding
N  Non-judgmental
S  Sympathetic
E  Encouraging
L  Listeners
O Offers suggestions
R  Ready to help
 
The 7 UPs of School Counseling:
 
School Counseling Helps Students:
  1. Build-Up relationships
  2. Grow-Up into responsible, compassionate citizens
  3. Soak-Up new learning
  4. Move-Up and transition to new adventures
  5. Chin-Up with new confidence
  6. Shape-Up behavior
  7. Build-Up self esteem
School counseling helps students realize their potential.
Individual Counseling:
Counselors meet with students in a one-to-one capacity when the student or an adult requests a meeting. These meetings are confidential (unless safety is a concern), and are to discuss issues such as academics, problem solving, goal setting, personal problems affecting school and other issues that may impact learning. Counseling sessions are generally brief.
 
Group Counseling:
Small groups are formed when a common need surfaces for a small group of students. Some examples include: resolving a conflict among a group of students, goal setting, adjusting to middle school etc. Participating in small groups can help students relate with other students who have similar challenges.

Middle School Study Skills for Success!

The middle school years are so important for a student's academic career! This is a time when habits are formed that will remain with students through high school and college. It is important to lay a solid foundation when it comes to time management and taking responsibility for the actions that lead to school success!

01
of 10

TIME MANAGEMENT FOR SCHOOL MORNINGS

Tween boys reading books leaning on tree trunk in autumn park
Hero Images / Getty Images

Middle school is the perfect time for students to learn to take charge of the morning routine. In addition to getting yourself ready, there are so many tasks to carry out (like packing book bags) and items to remember (like band instruments or lunch money) that careful time management is critical. If students can learn to manage this hectic time, they will be a step ahead of the game! This time management clock for school mornings helps students understand the need to get every task done in a timely manner. 

02
of 10

LEARNING TO BE ON TIME

The foundation for your success begins long before the first book is cracked in the school day. Successful students understand the importance of taking charge of their personal time and space, first and foremost. Once you're out the door, your job is to be punctual and ready for the school day. 

03
of 10

USING A HOMEWORK TIMER

Time management is also important when it comes to getting individual assignments done on time. Big problems can occur when you take too much time on a certain assignment, and then discover you don't have time to finish a big project that's due in the morning. Learn to pace yourself by using a fun homework timer. 

04
of 10

USING A PLANNER

Middle school is the time to start using a planner the right way. Every student can have different needs and preferences when it comes to picking the right planner, and that is the first important step. The next step is to learn to use memory boosters like flags, stars, stickers, and other items to mark upcoming dates. It doesn't do much good to remember a due date the night before - you must place a special marker a week ahead of the due date for best results. 

05
of 10

TAKING NOTES IN MATH CLASS

Middle school math lays the groundwork for the algebra concepts you'll encounter over the next few years. It is so important to establish good note-taking skills for your math classes because math is a discipline that you learn in layers. You must fully understand the building blocks you cover in middle school to progress through the more advanced math. Be sure to use multiple approaches for reviewing your math notes. 

06
of 10

LEARNING ABOUT LEARNING STYLES

Learning styles are more important for some students that for others, but the one thing that a learning style quiz can tell you is which type of active study strategies might work best for you. You might learn best by reading out loud and listening to recordings (auditory) or by drawing images and outlines of your social studies notes (tactile and visual). The more you act out your notes and readings, the more you'll reinforce the concepts in your brain.

07
of 10

GETTING ORGANIZED WITH COLOR CODING

Sometimes it's just hard to remember which items to take to school in the morning, which to take home with you in the afternoon, and which you should leave in your locker. If you color code your supplies, you might find it easier to remember the right notebooks and supplies when you pack your book bag each time. For example, when you pack your math book for homework before you leave school, you can also remember to pack the blue-coded notebook and blue plastic pouch that holds your pencils and calculator. 

08
of 10

LEARNING TO USE THE LOCAL LIBRARY

Your public library is so much more than a place that contains shelves and shelves of great books. You can learn many skills and develop great study habits right in your library! Some of these are:

  • learn to use a computer 
  • listen to authors read their books
  • check out documentaries
  • find help with all your homework questions
  • look at fascinating historical pictures of your hometown
  • There are so many reasons to explore your local library!
09
of 10

BUILDING YOUR SPELLING SKILLS

Middle school is the time to establish discipline when it comes to spelling words right, proofreading, and learning the difference between many commonly-confused words. If you can conquer spelling and vocabulary-building challenges, you are going to soar through high school and college writing activities! 

10
of 10

LEARNING TO CONCENTRATE LONGER

Have you ever wondered why your mind tends to wander when you're supposed to be reading a book or finishing your math problems? There are several non-medical reasons why you can't seem to concentrate on the task at hand. 

 
 
 
 
To access the quiz: 1) Right click on web address 
                                  2) Left click on Open link in new window
 
 
 
 
 
 
STRESS  IS THE ALARM CLOCK THAT LETS YOU KNOW YOU'VE ATTACHED TO SOMETHING NOT TRUE FOR YOU.
                                                                                -Byron Kalie
Middle School Stress Management:
 
To access the site:  1) Right click on web address 
                                  2) Left click on Open link in new window
 
 
GROWTH MINDSET:
CHANGE YOUR WORDS, CHANGE YOUR MINDSET - :)
Instead of Thinking...                            Try Thinking... 
 I'm not good at this.                                                What am I missing?
 I give up.                                                                   I'll use a different strategy.
 It's good enough.                                                      Is this really my best work?
 I can't make this better.                                            I can always improve.
 This is too hard.                                                       This may take some time.
 I made a mistake.                                                     Mistakes help me learn.
 I will never be smart.                                                I will learn how to do this.
The expert in anything was once a beginner!
As a Kindness Club Member, I will:
- Be Encouraging
- Be Supportive
- Be Positive
- Be Helpful
- Be Honest
- Be Considerate
- Be Thankful
- Be Responsible
- Be Respectful
- Be a Friend
GOOD PEOPLE SKILLS:
1. SMILE
2. USE GOOD MANNERS
3. ACKNOWLEDGE OTHERS
4. USE GREETINGS
5. USE PEOPLE'S NAMES
6. LOOK AT PEOPLE WHEN TALKING
7. LISTEN
8. ACCEPT DIFFERENCES
9. RESPECT OPINIONS OF OTHERS
10. GIVE COMPLIMENTS
WHAT TO DO WHEN THINGS DON'T GO YOUR WAY:
 
1. TAKE A STEP BACK AND EVALUATE
2. VENT IF YOU HAVE TO, BUT DON'T LINGER ON THE PROBLEM
3. REALIZE THERE ARE OTHERS OUT THERE FACING THIS TOO
4. PROCESS YOUR EMOTIONS (JOURNAL, AUDIO RECORD, TALK TO SOMEONE)
5. ACKNOWLEDGE YOUR THOUGHTS (RECOGNIZE THEIR PRESENCE)
6. GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK (GO FOR A WALK, LISTEN TO MUSIC, WATCH A MOVIE,
    GET SOME SLEEP)
7. UNCOVER WHAT YOU'RE REALLY UPSET ABOUT (CLUE: IT'S NOT THE WORLD)
8. SEE THIS AS AN OBSTACLE TO BE OVERCOME
9. ANALYZE THE SITUATION FOCUS ON ACTIONABLE STEPS
10. IDENTIFY HOW IT OCCURRED SO IT WON'T OCCUR AGAIN NEXT TIME
11. REALIZE THE SITUATION CAN BE A LOT WORSE
12. DO YOUR BEST, BUT DON'T KILL YOURSELF OVER IT
13. PICK OUT THE LEARNING POINTS FROM THE ENCOUNTER (ALWAYS SOMETHING 
      TO LEARN FROM EVERYTHING)
10 THINGS YOU MUST GIVE UP TO MOVE FORWARD:
  •   1. LETTING THE OPINIONS OF OTHERS CONTROL YOUR LIFE
  • IT'S NOT WHAT OTHERS THINK, IT'S WHAT YOU THINK ABOUT YOURSELF THAT COUNTS.
  • YOU HAVE TO DO EXACTLY WHAT'S BEST FOR YOU AND YOUR LIFE, NOT WHAT'S BEST FOR EVERYONE ELSE.  
                                                                   
  •   2. THE SHAME OF PAST FAILURES
  •  YOUR PAST DOES NOT EQUAL YOUR FUTURE.
  •  ALL THAT MATTERS IS WHAT YOU DO RIGHT NOW.
 
  •   3. BEING INDECISIVE ABOUT WHAT YOU WANT
  • YOU WILL NEVER LEAVE WHERE YOU ARE UNTIL YOU DECIDE WHERE YOU WOULD RATHER BE.
  • MAKE A DECISION TO FIGURE OUT WHAT YOU WANT, AND THEN PURSUE IT PASSIONATELY.
 
  • 4. PROCRASTINATING ON THE GOALS THAT MATTER TO YOU
  • THERE ARE TWO PRIMARY CHOICES IN LIFE TO ACCEPT CONDITIONS AS THEY EXIST, OR ACCEPT THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR CHANGING THEM.
  • THE BEST TIME TO PLANT A TREE IS TWENTY YEARS AGO. THE SECOND BEST TIME IS NOW.
 
  • 5CHOOSING TO DO NOTHING
  • YOU DON'T GET TO CHOOSE HOW YOU ARE GOING TO DIE, OR WHEN.
  • YOU CAN ONLY DECIDE HOW YOU ARE GOING TO LIVE, RIGHT NOW.
  • EVERY DAY IS A NEW CHANCE TO CHOOSE.
 
  • 6.YOUR NEED TO BE RIGHT
  • AIM FOR SUCCESS, BUT NEVER GIVE UP YOUR RIGHT TO BE WRONG.
  • BECAUSE WHEN YOU DO, YOU WILL ALSO LOSE YOUR ABILITY TO LEARN NEW THINGS AND MOVE FORWARD WITH YOUR LIFE.
 
  • 7. RUNNING FROM PROBLEMS THAT SHOULD BE FIXED
  • STOP RUNNING!
  • FACE THESE ISSUES, FIX THE PROBLEMS, COMMUNICATE, APPRECIATE, FORGIVE AND LOVE THE PEOPLE IN YOUR LIFE WHO DESERVE IT.
 
  • 8. MAKING EXCUSES RATHER THAN DECISIONS
  • MOST LONG-TERM FAILURES ARE THE OUTCOME OF PEOPLE WHO MAKE EXCUSES INSTEAD OF DECISIONS
 
  • 9. OVERLOOKING THE POSITIVE POINTS IN YOUR LIFE
  • WHAT YOU SEE OFTEN DEPENDS ENTIRELY ON WHAT YOU'RE LOOKING FOR.
  • YOU WILL HAVE A HARD TIME EVER BEING HAPPY IF YOU AREN'T THANKFUL FOR THE GOOD THINGS IN YOUR LIFE RIGHT NOW.
 
  • 10. NOT APPRECIATING THE PRESENT MOMENT
  • TOO OFTEN WE TRY TO ACCOMPLISH SOMETHING BIG WITHOUT REALIZING THAT THE GREATEST PART OF LIFE IS MADE UP OF THE LITTLE THINGS.
YOUR TOP 10 TIPS FOR STUDY SKILLS!
1. FIND THE BEST STUDY METHOD FOR YOU
2. EAT WELL
3. EXERCISE REGULARLY
4. STAY POSITIVE
5. GET ENOUGH SLEEP
6. TAKE BREAKS
7. SET GOALS
8. FIND THE BEST STUDY TIME FOR YOU
9. EXAMS CAN BE GOOD!
10. SLEEP ON IT

At a Glance: Signs of Stress in Your Middle-Schooler


Kids with learning and attention issues may not realize that they are stressed. Here are some red flags to watch for in your middle-school student:


Red flag: Your daughter’s been complaining of “bad pains” in her head and neck. You take her to the doctor and have her eyes checked, but nothing seems to be wrong.


The issue: When the mind is overwhelmed, it can affect the body. Complaints include body pain, tiredness, headaches and stomachaches.

__________________________________________________________


Red flag: She’s stopped wanting to go to her Wednesday afternoon dance class. In fact, she doesn’t want to do much after school these days other than come home and stay home.


The issue: After a day at school, an overwhelmed student may retreat to a place where she can avoid challenges.

__________________________________________________________


Red flag: You ask what homework your son has and he says, “None.” You find out two days later he had a big math test and failed it.


The issue: A student may become so overwhelmed that he can “check out.” He may lie to avoid facing the challenge.

__________________________________________________________


Red flag: A teacher calls to say your daughter has been unusually difficult. She’s fiddling with her phone, rummaging through her purse...everything but focusing.


The issue: Stress can play out as fidgeting behavior. At home, you may notice she’s having difficulty sleeping.

__________________________________________________________


Red flag: You ask your son if he’s started working on his English project. He flies back at you, “Why can’t you just leave me alone?” I feel like a prisoner here!”


The issue: Anger, aggression and emotional reactions are classic signs of a child who is overwhelmed. It might seem that just about anything triggers him to go off, but it’s a sign that there’s more going on.


Traits & Characteristics of Middle School Learners


Young adolescence is a pivotal time of physical, intellectual, social and emotional development. Middle school learners experience more development at this age than any other stage in their lives with the exception of infancy. The development of middle school learners profoundly impact their educational experience. Therefore, it’s essential for parents and educators to acknowledge the unique characteristics of middle school learners in order to maximize their learning experience.


Physical


Middle school learners experience a wealth of physical changes. Although girls are often more physically advanced than boys, both boys and girls experience disproportionate bone and muscle growth that results in feelings of discomfort, awkwardness and restlessness. Students also experience frequent hormonal imbalances that lead to hunger, excitement or lethargy. When working with students, a variety of activities should be included that will appeal to their senses and keep them actively involved.


Intellectual


Middle school students have short-term memories, as well as, short attention spans. Consequently, students should be presented with limited amounts of new information, allowing them time to retain material. Opportunities should be provided to reinforce prior learning and concepts. Middle school learners look for relationships between lessons and life, and they desire active involvement in learning. They will also begin to clarify their ideas and discuss thoughts with others. Although students can be argumentative and inquisitive, they do not have the ability to fully comprehend abstract ideas. Therefore, activities should help students develop their problem solving and critical thinking skills.


Social


Young adolescents generally desire more autonomy. However, students also crave social acceptance and interaction. Students will begin to interact with the opposite sex, but their same-sex relationships will supersede those with the opposite sex. During this time, middle school learners will challenge significant adults and educators by testing their limits. However, it’s important for all adult family members and educators to continue expressing their love along with rules and expectations. Despite their behavior, middle school learners yearn for adult role models and guidance.


Emotional


Middle school learners are usually self-conscious, persistently judging themselves by their physical appearance and development. Due to fluctuating moods, middle school students are easy to offend yet can be inconsiderate to others. In addition to this, middle school students often believe their problems and experiences are unique to who they are. Despite adult interaction, students feel that adults can’t possibly understand what teens are going through. Overall, middle school students seek to find out who they are as individuals.


Getting to Know Your Class


Class________________          Teacher______________________

 

Period_______________          Teacher’s Email__________________


Required Materials:





 

Grading:

Is the class weighted? If so, what are categories and weights? If not, how does the grading work?




What is the lowest A, B. C. and D?

A:                     B:                    C:                    D:


Will your teacher round up from a 0.5?______Yes          _____No


Absent/Make-up Work Policy and Procedures:







Late Work Policies:







Participation Points:

Does your teacher offer participation points?_____Yes     _____No

If yes, how do you earn participation points in this class?







Other Important Notes About This Class:







Transition Tips for Children Starting Middle School

Transition tips for children starting middle school are more important than many parents realize.

There are lots of worries for these students, but the top three areas of worry tend to be logistical, social and academic.

Logistical Worries

The majority of the time a middle school building is going to be much larger than an elementary building. Students are actually afraid of knowing WHERE TO GO! This is a concern that parents can solve for their student before school starts! Being proactive with your child’s logistical worries can cause a major decrease in those worries and will lesson your child’s stress level!  Here are a few tips to solve this worry:

1.  Visit the school building and take a detailed tour BEFORE school starts. You may need to go several times if it is a really large school. Be sure to locate restrooms that are closest to all your child’s classes. Get a class schedule and walk the schedule room to room. Don’t forget to find the cafeteria!

2.  Read the school handbook BEFORE school starts together with your child. If you child knows in advance how much time they have between classes and how long it will take to walk to each class…they won’t be as stressed out. If they understand what the consequences are for being tardy to class, etc. it will ease their uneasiness.

3.  Put a map of the school with your child’s classroom’s highlighted in their binder so they will have it handy the first day.  

4.  Practice opening the combination lock so your child will be able to quickly unlock their locker between classes.  

Social Worries

Middle school is social maze compared to elementary school. You are changing classes each period and you will be in classes with a lot more students then you were in elementary school. This can be overwhelming for children that like the comfort of a single classroom with a group of the same children each day. Your child is also thinking about the fact that they are the youngest in this maze. It is easy as adults to downplay our children’s fears, but middle school brings a lot of pressure to be social. Here are some ideas if your child is worried about the social aspects of the transition to middle school:

1.  Remind your child that they will have the opportunity to meet a lot of students by changing classes each period. Talk about this change in a positive light and emphasize the opportunity for more potential friends.  

2.  Encourage your child to get involved at school. There will be a lot more activities to join then there were in elementary school. Sports, clubs, fine arts and other activities can help your child find their niche.

3.  Have a heart to heart talk with your child about being who they are. It is more important to be yourself than to be “cool” and to fit in. Encourage them to hang out with kid’s they like and with whom they are comfortable. Talk about the importance of not compromising their beliefs and convictions to gain “friends”.

4.  Some children need to go over some basic social skills. Talk to your child about how to join in conversations without interrupting and how to be a good friend.

Academic Worries

There is a big difference in the work-load from elementary to middle school. Typically, there will be more homework and more independence is expected from the students. Parents need to do a good job of getting their child ready for the changes that will take place in middle school academically. Some common issues the children will face are: lots of different teachers—each having different expectations, more homework, bigger need to be organized and the work may be a lot harder. Some tips that can help:

1.  It is imperative that you work with your child during the first few weeks of school to create an organizational system that works for them. They have to be organized to stay on top of each class and the homework. If your child is organized it will ease a lot of stress.

2.  Encourage your child to talk to their teachers. There is a stereotype that teachers in middle and high school aren’t as caring or concerned as elementary teachers. This is not necessarily the case! I know firsthand that middle school teachers do care about your child’s success!  Let your child know that it is okay to ask questions if they don’t understand an assignment!

3.  Show your child how Infinite Campus works so that they can stay on top of their grades. Let your child know that you will also be keeping a close eye on if they are turning all their work in, etc.

4.  Work on your child’s time management skills. There will be more projects type assignments in middle school that will require time management. If your child has good skills in this area early on they will have a much better chance of success!

Middle School doesn’t have to be a scary transition for your child if you are willing to take some time and work with them. If you will follow these transition tips for children starting middle school, I think your child will breeze through this transition with flying colors!  

 

STUDENT SURVIVAL TIPS FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL TRANSITION


Middle school is a great opportunity to meet new people and begin to explore who you are and what you want to do with the rest of your life. It can also be a difficult time, as there are a lot of things that are changing in your life. You are meeting new people. There more choices and decisions to make. Instead of being in one classroom with one teacher all day, you now have multiple teachers. You no longer stay in one classroom; instead, you have to switch classes for different subjects. You will be faced with more responsibilities. Here are a few tips to help you with the middle school transition. Don’t be afraid to ask your teachers, counselor, or staff at your school if you need help!


1.GET ORGANIZED.

  • Use your Lincoln Middle School Planner.
  • Color-code your folders and notebooks, OR use an accordion file.
  • Keep your locker and backpack cleaned out.

2. DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

        You will have more homework. Schedule your

time wisely. Allot a certain amount of time every night for homework and study. Don’t wait until an assignment is due - start early. Keep track of your homework assignments and their due dates.


3.TALK TO YOUR TEACHERS.

       Ask questions. If you are unsure of an assignment, what you need to be doing, or of anything, just ask. Your teachers are there to help you.


4. GET INVOLVED IN EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES.

        Find things that you enjoy - sports, clubs, activities, and get involved. This is a great way to meet new people and to have fun.


5. GET GOOD GRADES.

      Turn your homework in on time, ask questions and take advantage of extra-credit opportunities.


6. STAY HEALTHY.

      Get a good night’s sleep, and eat a good breakfast before school.


7. TALK TO YOUR PARENTS AND KEEP THEM INFORMED OF WHAT IS GOING ON IN YOUR MIDDLE SCHOOL LIFE.


8. FIND AN ADULT YOU TRUST TO TALK TO WHEN YOU HAVE PROBLEMS.


9. CHOOSE YOUR FRIENDS WISELY.

      Choose friends who make good decisions.


10. COME TO SCHOOL AND HAVE FUN.

       You can’t learn if you are not at school.  

 

PARENT SURVIVAL TIPS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL TRANSITION!


For children going into middle school, there are many anxieties, apprehensions and fears to deal with and overcome. Middle schools are larger than elementary schools, the school work is harder, there are more classes and more teachers - all with different expectations and personalities. If you have a child who is entering middle school for the first time, know that it is normal for your child to express concern.


1. DON’T BE TOO ANXIOUS ABOUT YOUR CHILD GOING TO MIDDLE SCHOOL.

      Talk about the middle school experience in a positive way! Your enthusiasm and support can help make this BIG change in your child’s school life a positive one.


2. HELP YOUR CHILD DEVELOP AN ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGY.

  • Designate a study space and set a consistent study time.
  • Buy your child the necessary folders and binders to stay organized.
  • Conduct a weekly clean-up.
  • Keep a master calendar.
  • Prepare for the week/day ahead.
  • Provide help and support while your child is learning to become more organized.

3. UTILIZE LINCOLN MIDDLE SCHOOL RESOURCES.

  • Explore Lincoln Middle School’s website with your child.

 

1. Right click on link

                        2. Click on "Open link in a new window"

 

http://www.swcsd2.org

  

 

  • Homework is updated by some teachers on the website.
  • You can access “Infinite Campus” to check grades and progress.

4. PRACTICE A COMBINATION LOCK WITH YOUR CHILD OVER THE SUMMER.


5. TALK ABOUT SOCIAL SKILLS.

      Talk about traits that make a good friend. Discuss how words and actions can affect other people. Practice skills needed for difficult social situations.


6. OPENLY COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR CHILD.

      Keep the lines of communication open between your child and school staff. Be informed, listen, and talk to your child.


7. GET INVOLVED AS A PARENT.

      Attend parent-teacher conferences, and/or other events where you can connect with your child’s teachers and the school.


8. ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILD TO GET INVOLVED IN SCHOOL ACTIVITIES.

      Have them join a team, club, or other extracurricular activity and attend after-school events.


9. HELP YOUR CHILD TO BE HIS OR HER OWN ADVOCATE.

       Encourage your child to discuss problems and solutions with teachers on their own, but be ready to help as needed.


10. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OPPORTUNITIES TO TOUR THE BUILDING.

       Attend orientation meetings, registration, and other opportunities.


HOW TO SURVIVE

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Middle school is a big step in any teen’s life. You will be facing challenging classes and getting extra homework. Middle school, however, is not all work!

 

AVOIDING TROUBLE

 

1. Know and obey your school’s rules!​ A good attitude is important for your and everybody else’s learning benefit. You don’t want to get in trouble with the teachers or principals in your first year for breaking all sorts of rules you didn’t even know about. ​

 

Find the Lincoln Middle School Student Handbook on the school district website.

 

Make sure you learn the school’s dress code, as well as, the other rules and then follow them! Even if your friends are breaking the rules, don’t follow their example. Make an effort to stay in the good behavior column.

 

2. ​Avoid drama and gossip.​ There will be lots of gossip and some really malicious (mean) rumors floating around. Never start rumors; they only break friendships, create enemies, hurt feelings, and make things worse for everyone. Gossip may seem juicy at first, but it causes unnecessary pain in the end. Do your best to stay away from it!

 

● Help to stop rumors by not spreading them.

 

● Protect other people’s privacy and mistakes. You wouldn’t want someone spreading your personal secrets around, would you?

 

● Drama is unnecessary. Some people think that a life has to be filled with melodrama to be important and appreciated by others. It does not. Focus on the things, people, and ideas that are important.

 

3. ​Choose your friends wisely.​ This is very important. Be friends with people who don’t start or participate in drama, and you’ll avoid the worst things that happen in middle school. Establish a small group of good friends. Every group will face a few problems. If necessary, you might consider a more sensible group of friends.

 

● Understand that in middle school you may find that some people may just not like you. Be nice and friendly to everyone, but don’t worry about making everyone love you.

 

4. ​Don’t let your friends get you in trouble. If someone asks you to lie about something, do something illegal, or do something to hurt someone else, ​don’t do it​. Don’t do ​anything ​that makes you feel uncomfortable, or what you think is wrong. This is called peer pressure and can lead to all sorts of problems.

 

● Don’t be afraid to tell an adult if someone asks, or tells you to do something really bad. If you make a bad decision, talk to an adult you can trust.

 

5. ​Don’t do anything that will harm your body. Just like you don’t want to do something to hurt other people, you shouldn’t do anything to hurt yourself.

 

6. ​Don’t worry about gym. You might feel like everyone is watching you while you change, but they are really focusing on getting themselves changed. Everyone wants to just keep to themselves and change as quickly as possible.

 

7. ​Learn how to solve problems. This is a really important skill, not just for getting through middle school, but for getting through your whole life. If you learn good ways to solve problems, you’ll be able to handle anything that comes your way.

 

● For example, you should learn to ask for help when you need it. Sometimes you’ll feel silly asking for help or you don’t want to admit that you’re having problems, but you don’t have to. Everyone has problems, and whoever you ask for help will understand. They’ve had to ask for help at some point too.

 

● Apologize and accept consequences when you’ve done something wrong. After making a mistake, refusing to acknowledge that you did something bad (even if you didn’t mean to) will just make things harder for you. You’ll feel guilty or you’ll have to deal with people being angry with you, and you don’t want that. If you spread a rumor, apologize. If you lie to a teacher, confess.

 

● Communicate clearly. By doing this, you are avoiding most of the problems people face. A lot of the time, rumors get started because someone misunderstands what you say or you misunderstand what they say. You might also accidentally offend someone if you say something you don’t mean. Be careful, clear and always make sure you know what you’re saying.

 

8. ​Always know that it gets better. Middle school can be really hard. Just believe that there will be happy times, and there will be sad times, but no matter how bad it gets, things will always get better.

 

MAKING FRIENDS

 

1. ​Find people you know. A few elementary school friends can make plans by phone.

 

2. ​Find people that live near you​. Once you start school, you can also try to make friends with people you see getting on and off at the same bus stop. Friends that live in your neighborhood can be handy, since you’ll have an easier time hanging out or you’ll have someone nearby that you can call for homework or advice.

 

3. ​Be open to new friends. Even if you have a whole bunch of your elementary friends coming with you to middle school, you should still try to make some new friends. If you don’t try to meet new people, you’ll never know what you’re missing. Maybe someone you meet will be your best friend for a while.

 

4. ​Join clubs. A great way to meet new friends is to join clubs at your new school.

 

● Don’t forget about sports! There are sports teams if you want to join a team, but there might also be clubs that are just about watching or playing friendly matches.

 

● Volunteering is also a sort of club that will help you meet new people to befriend. Watch for and ask about fund raising events, making cards for military personnel, cleaning up local parks, or other great activities.

 

5. ​Show your interests. You should show what you’re interested in, in subtle ways so that people that like the same thing will know they can come up and talk to you about it. This is a great way to make friends, because you’ll know you already have something in common.

 

● For example, if you like superheros, you can wear a superhero pin on your backpack. If you like video games, get a class binder with a picture from your favorite game on it. If you like a sports team, wear a bracelet for that team.

 

6. ​Act self-confident. If you show people that you think you’re a great person to be friends with, and that you think you have a lot to offer to people, then they’ll be much more likely to want to be friends with you. Don’t constantly apologize and don’t back down if people don’t immediately like you. Speak up for yourself, stand up straight, and celebrate the things that make you unique.

 

7. ​Talk to people. This is the most important part of making new friends! You’ll never make friends if you don’t talk to people. Join conversations that sound interesting, and introduce yourself to people you think you’d like to have as friends.

 

● Don’t forget to speak up so that people can hear you! Talk like you mean it.

 

8. ​Do fun things. If other people see you enjoying yourself, they want to join in and be friends with you so that they can have fun too. You can do fun things by joining clubs, drawing in between classes, or putting together parties or other activities for after school.

 

9. ​Be nice. If you want friends, it’s important to be a nice person. Be nice to everyone you meet, even if they aren’t nice back. People will notice that you are a great person, and they will be much more likely to be nice to you.

 

● It is important to be actively nice, not just polite. Help people that have trouble in class, stand up for others when they’re getting bullied, and do nice things for people when you can. Also, give people honest compliments when they seem like they need it.

 

● You never know when someone is going through some really tough times. They could feel hurt, and they might not show it. Your kind words or deeds could make a world of difference to them.

 

● Remember that sometimes when people are really acting awful, they do that because they feel bad about themselves or something that’s happening in their life. They’re mean because they may not know what kindness looks like. Try to be nice to them even if they’re mean to you. It might help make them a better person.

 

ACING ACADEMICS

 

1. Pay attention in class. If you want to do well in class, the best place to start is to pay attention! It’s amazing how much your grades will go up if you just pay attention, and try to absorb as much information from the lesson as possible. Don’t mess with your phone, try not to daydream, and don’t pass notes with friends.

 

2. ​Take notes. Take notes in class. You don’t have to write down everything that the teacher says; just write down the really important or hard to remember information. Write the sort of stuff you’d say if you were explaining the lesson to someone who wasn’t there. This will help you study for tests later and also do your homework.

 

3. ​Do your homework. This is really important for getting decent grades. If you don’t do your homework, you’re almost guaranteed to get bad grades. Find some quiet time each evening and just work to get your homework done. Get help if you need it! Your homework shouldn’t take so much time that you don’t have time to relax too.

 

4. ​Stay organized. Don’t just shove everything in your backpack. This will make you forget about assignments or lose important papers. Instead, have a binder for homework assignments and organize them by when they are due. Have another binder for class notes, organized by subject.

 

● Use your planner. You also want to keep your life organized! Get a planner and carefully organize your day. Set aside time for homework, time for hanging out, time for getting ready and eating breakfast in the morning, and everything else you need to do during your day.

 

5. ​Don’t procrastinate. Lots of people develop the very bad habit of procrastinating. This means that they don’t do things when they should. Instead, they wait until the last minute! This is bad, because it means that when you do things, you’ll not do your best work because you’ll be rushed. It will also make you really stressed. Develop a good habit of doing things at the appropriate time, and you’ll save yourself a lot of trouble.

 

6. ​Ask questions. This is a great way to make sure you improve your grades. When you don’t understand something, ask! This way you know you’re doing something right. Even if you do understand something, it’s good to ask questions if you’re curious about something else. Always ask questions, and you’ll find yourself getting smarter and smarter.

 

7. ​Study as much as you can. If you really want good grades, you’ll need to study. Read all the books you are assigned and set aside plenty of time to study. Middle school is an important time to develop good school habits, so getting use to studying now will really help you later.

 

8. ​Don’t stress over your grades. Focus on learning as much as you can, developing good school habits, and get the best grades you can.

 

IMPROVING YOURSELF

 

1. Explore yourself. Middle school is a great time to explore the things you enjoy, and figure out what is important to you. You should take ​exploratory classes that you think you might like, learn to do things you have always wanted to learn how to do, and read about things you’d like to do in the future.

 

● Read books about people who inspire you. Figure out what they did to get to where they got, and figure out if you want to do the same.

 

● Activities/Clubs are a great way to explore things that make you happy! Try joining one at Lincoln Middle School.

 

2. ​Maintain good hygiene habits. Make sure you’re washing your body, keeping your face clean, wearing clean clothes and other things to keep yourself looking nice. This will help you develop confidence and make you feel comfortable.

 

3. ​Learn to balance responsibilities with fun. While it’s important to devote time to learning while you’re in middle school, it’s also important for you to learn how to balance responsibility with fun and relaxation.

 

4. ​Get involved. You may not realize it now, because many people don’t, but helping others can be the most rewarding thing you ever do. Make a positive difference in your community, and the world can make you feel like a superhero because you’ll be one!

 

5. ​Exercise and eat healthy. School is all about getting you mind fit and healthy, but you need to make sure your body stays healthy too. Make sure you eat right, and get plenty of good exercise to keep your body in good condition.

 

6. ​Work on your talents. If you’re good at something, you should find ways to do those things! Get better and better at things you enjoy and that you’re good at. Your talents can often be turned into a great job or hobby when you’re older (or even now). Talk to your parents about what you can do, and if they can’t help, talk to a teacher.

 

● For example, if you’re good at drawing, take an art class. If you have a talent for learning songs, join the band. If you’re good at math, offer to tutor other students. The possibilities are endless!

 

7. ​Don’t sweat the little things. You’ll be a much happier person, and it will be much easier to deal with problems and the stress of middle school if you learn to only work on the problems that really matter. This can be hard to do, and will probably take a long time to learn, but it’s worth keeping in mind.

 

8. ​Believe that you are normal. There will be many times where you will feel different and alone. The important thing to understand is that families come in all shapes and sizes. You are just like everyone else. No matter how your family looks.


GET TO SCHOOL ON TIME!

BEAT THE MORNING RUSH BY GETTING (MOSTLY) READY THE NIGHT BEFORE!

 

1. Shower and wash and dry your hair.

 

 2. Choose your outfit at night, too-lay it out neatly on

your desk chair.

 

 3. Pack your backpack-don’t forget your homework

and lunch money.

 

 4. Need to remember anything else? Put a post-it note

reminder by the door.




EMOTIONAL SELF-CHECK
5 I can't stand this. I'm ready to explode.
      I want to hit or kick someone or something. I need an adult to help me go to a safe place so I can calm down.
 
4 I am getting too angry.
       
       My brain isn't working clearly. I might say or do something I will be sorry for later. I need to go to my safe place at the back table to calm down.
 
 
3 I am getting really irritated.
       
       I need to walk away from a bad situation. I will tell my teacher that I need a break.
 
2 I am doing OK.
       
       I'm not pleased, but I'm not upset. I can stay where I am and keep working. I can control my anger by myself.
 
1 I am doing great.
     
       I feel good about myself, and about what is going on around me.
 
.
Middle School Planning For College:
Paying
College can be expensive and it may take years of planning to find the school with the right fit and the right cost for you, so it's never too early to start saving for college! All the work you'll put in planning and studying really does pay off, because a college education means a higher salary after graduation. So start thinking about it and planning for it now!
 
Planning
7th grade students:
  • Improve your reading,writing, and math skills and take Algebra 1 or a foreign language class in 8th grade.
  • Work for A's and B's and join a school club or athletic team.
  • Participate in a GEAR UP program.
  • Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs helps 7th-12th grade income-eligible students prepare for college.
  • Talk to your parents about a 529 college savings plan (A 529 plan is sponsored by states, state agencies, or educational institutions, and can help you start saving for college early).
 
8th grade students:
  • Keep your grades up to prepare for high school courses.
  • Choose a college prep curriculum when you enroll in high school.
  • Attend a community or school workshop on how to pay for college.
  • Talk to family, friends, and teachers about your college plans and ask questions to discover what may be right for you!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          CAREER
  • Do you like to be outdoors? Do you like to read and write? Would you rather build things with your hands? Think about what you like to do and find out if there's a way to turn it into a career at one of Wyoming's seven state schools.
 
For more information, on a search engine go to:
 
Wyoming Hathaway Scholarships

ORGANIZE YOUR LOCKER!

  • Get rid of clutter-trash things you don’t need!

  • Hang up your clothes.

  • Keep your pencils, pens, and markers in a pencil case.

  • Arrange your books and binders in order-from your first class of the day to your last.

Note Taking Habits

{Write the date}


    Main Points-usually a definition, important date or fact.


    Sub Points-Expand on the main point with more information.


    Write out examples and draw a cute shape around it to stand out & remember.

--------------------------------------

Don’t worry about writing everything down word for word.

--------------------------------------

Come prepared so you know key points. Try and read before class.

--------------------------------------

Listen! Some of the most important information is given this way.

--------------------------------------

Don’t worry about making your notes pretty right now.

--------------------------------------

Rewriting Your Notes:

  • Color code if you want

     (add a color key)


  • Type on computer

     (ex. Google document)


  • This is a perfect way to

     revise and study.

  • Put your favorite note

    taking technique to

    work.

    (ex. Flashcards)

--------------------------------------

Book Notes:

  • Look at summary at the back of the chapter.

  • Use the same process

     as lecture notes.


  • Draw any tables,

    diagrams, etc. that will

    help you.


  • Try & write in your own

     words. It will help you

     remember.




5 TIPS TO KEEP YOUR NOTES ORGANIZED!

PREPARE - Don’t scramble for a pen and paper. Go to class with all your materials ready.

ORGANIZE - Keep your notes for each class in one place. Use a binder or multi-subject notebook to keep notes together. Remember to include a place for loose handouts.

LABEL - Use dividers to separate each class into sections by unit or topic.

CHRONOLOGY - It can be tempting to shove your notes into your binder after a long class, but take the time to ensure that they are in the correct order (You could number the pages). Better to take the time now rather than search for them when you need to study.

MAINTAIN - Go through your binder or notebook weekly to ensure that there are no loose papers, and repair any that may have ripped.


 

STUDY SKILLS

  • Pay attention in class.
  • Take good notes.
  • Keep an organized

       notebook for each subject.

  • Know the purpose of each  

       assignment.        

  • Ask questions in class.  
  • Review, Review, Review. It

      can help you retain 80% of

     the information.

  • Plan a definite time and

   place for studying each day.

  • Study for a while and take

      short breaks.

  • Don’t cram for hours the

     night before a test.

     Study a little bit each day.

  • Think positive.
  • Do your best!                                                                                                            






 

8 Tips for Studying

 1. Put on comfortable clothing.

2. Turn off all distractions.

3. Get a healthy snack and water

bottle.

4. Get all study materials together.

5. Gather colorful post-it notes and

pens.

6. Organize notes, textbooks, and

throw out unnecessary papers.

7. Take breaks.

8. Study in chunks, don’t cram last

minute.




 

24 Tips for Studying and Taking Tests!


At School Before Test Day:

  • Have a positive attitude
  • Be alert
  • Keep track of important dates
  • Participate in class
  • Stay organized

At Home Before Test Day:

  • Create a study routine
  • Study in a quiet spot
  • Do your homework
  • Have your test supplies ready
  • Get a good night’s sleep

Test Day:

  • Wear comfortable clothing
  • Eat a good breakfast
  • Relax before the test
  • Take 3 deep breaths
  • Read all the directions carefully.
  • Read all possible answer choices
  • Cross out wrong answers
  • Write answers neatly
  • Do your best work
  • Don’t rush
  • Reread your answer
  • Work at your own pace
  • Skip hard questions until the end
  • Answer all the questions



Enter you

BE RESPECTFUL!

Recognize that everyone is different.

Empathy is to recognize and connect.

Self monitor. (think First)

Personal space. (give a little room)

Earn trust through your actions.

Cheer on others and their success.

Treat everyone as an equal.



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6 “Soft” Skills Our Middle School Students Need!

These six social and study skills for middle school students will stay with them long after they leave the classroom.

1. How to mono-task.

Kids need to know how to do one thing at a time. Sustained concentration takes effort with tasks we are not comfortable doing.

2. How they study best.  

We tell kids to study all the time, but they don’t realize that the process may look different for different people. Some people have to write things down to remember them. Others need to say them out loud. Personally, I remember things best if I walk around the room while I’m studying. For some kids, “study” means “look at your notes for a predetermined period of time.” No focus necessary. This is not effective studying.

When kids need to study, talk about ways to retain information, and kids come up with a plan for how they’ll spend their study time. After they take an assessment, ask them to reflect on the effectiveness of their study strategies.

3. How to use meta-cognition.

This goes with the previous learning goal. As an adult, I can read a paragraph, realize that I wasn’t paying attention or didn’t understand it, and then go back and read it again. Most kids don’t do that. They don’t read for understanding; they read because someone told them to read. If they have decoded all the words in a given text—whether those words make any sense or not—they’re done.

Help them learn how to check their understanding as they read and figure out the parts they don’t get the first time. Model this, especially when we’re reading nonfiction.

4. How to prioritize.

Whenever I have a job I don’t want to do, I procrastinate by doing something else. That way I’m still doing something productive, so I don’t feel bad about not tackling whatever I should’ve been doing. Kids do the exact same thing with projects. If told to do a research presentation, they’re going to have 17 really intricate slide transitions before they do a single bit of research. Ask them, and they think they’ve spent their time productively working on their project.

Help them to learn how to focus on the difficult parts of a project first, then move on to the fun stuff. At the beginning of a class project, help them create a list of steps that have to be completed in order. Ask them to spend a few minutes at the beginning of the activity prioritizing what needs to get done first and how they’re going to accomplish it.

5. How to play to their strengths.

In group work, help them create strategic plans. Let your good readers read, let your neat writers write, let your good artists draw the cartoon for your project, and let the leaders decide what pages you’re reading for homework tonight. It’s okay if not everybody does the exact same things.

6. How to read—and maybe even write—for pleasure.

Helping students is my favorite part of my job. Lucky for me, it’s also the most important. Kids who read independently for pleasure go on to have greater success academically, professionally, and personally according to several well-documented studies. Modeling a love of reading, making room for passion in writing, and pointing kids toward the right books are all hugely important components of teaching middle school.

There are skills I want our kids to have. If our students leave a little better at these six things than they were at the beginning of the year, I’ll feel that we’ve done something to prepare them for the future, no matter what that future holds.





In the 2018-2019 school year, We will be welcoming our district 6th Graders to our Lincoln Middle School Family!

10 THINGS 6TH GRADERS WANT YOU TO KNOW…RAPPORT BUILDING 101!

Here are 10 things 6th graders want you to know…

#1: THIS IS A BIGGIE…Bust out the running man, your version or theirs. It will get a laugh either way! Don’t get me wrong, dance! They will get a big kick out of it and then join in the fun.

#2: KINDNESS MATTERS. Always be a little kinder than necessary. Some days 6th graders can be downright moody. We all have those days. Sometimes a simple, “What’s going on, you don’t seem like yourself today?” goes much farther than anything else you could ever dream of saying. Keep that question in your back pocket.  6th graders need your compassion and your kindness.

#3: LISTEN. Listen to their stories and learn about their lives. They have to listen to the stories you tell, give them that same courtesy.

#4: HAVE GOODIES ON HAND. Stickers, ribbons, baked goods, trinkets are all well-loved by BIG KIDS. 6th graders may seem like they are “too cool for school,” but they will eat them up and love them!  

#5: BE CONSISTENT. Do what you say you are going to do and stick to your guns! 6th graders want you to be accountable and are expecting it!  You may not believe this, but they remember everything you say you are going to do.  

#6: ESTABLISH A ROUTINE AND HAVE STRUCTURE! Structure, structure, structure! They want to know what is coming next! Prepare them, update them, and keep them informed. A well-informed 6th grader is a diligent 6th grader.

#7: SHARE MEALS. 6th graders like to eat lunch with you! While they love to eat lunch and socialize with friends, they also love the chance to have a one-on-one or small group lunch with YOU. This doesn’t have to take place every day, but 6th graders like to know that this is an option.


#8:  AUTHENTIC COMPLIMENTS. 6th graders love to be complimented and recognized for doing special things. They want you to brag about them when something is done particularly well or they have gone above and beyond! Let them hear you bragging, too!

#9: STUDYING AND ORGANIZING HAS NOT BEEN MASTERED YET. Most 6th graders don’t have it all together. Their desk will be a wreck, their locker may have a bagged lunch that is week’s old. You will need to teach them organizational skills and continuously help with the organizing process. The same goes for studying! Teach them how you want them to organize and study, and practice often. Don’t expect either of these to be automatic.

Lastly…

#10: BE THEIR BIGGEST CHEERLEADER!  6th graders will be your most loyal fans! Forever!  Cheer them on in any way you can.  Attend their extracurricular activities, ask about their weekends, and encourage them to try new things because YOU KNOW THEY CAN DO WHATEVER THEY SET THEIR MINDS TO!


Developmental Characteristics of 6th Graders


Every child’s development is unique. Although children develop through a generally predictable sequence of milestones, we cannot say exactly when a child will reach each and every stage. Every child has his or her own timetable. The characteristics below are offered only as a reference to give you a better understanding of your child.


The Eleven -Year-Old

Physical Development

  • Vast appetite for food, physical activity, and talking
  • Growth spurt of early adolescence for some girls, may feel awkward and clumsy
  • Girls ahead of guys in physical maturity; boys’ big growth spurt may not start until 14; Boys worry if they are ever going to grow
  • Wide differences among individuals in rate of development
  • Curious about opposite sex; girls usually interested first
  • Tiredness; need for more sleep
  • Often uncomfortable with questions and observations about how much they have grown and physical changes
  • Increased need for personal hygiene

Social and Emotional Development

  • Less overt affection and attention shown to parents, with occasional rudeness; tests limits
  • Impulsive, unaware
  • Focus on self, alternating between high expectations and poor self-concept
  • Have tendency to return to childish behavior, particularly when stressed
  • Experience extremes of emotions
  • Inclusive/exclusion; height of cliques, seek to belong, discovery of telephone
  • Experimenting with behavior, roles, appearance, self-image
  • Difficulty with decisions but need to be able to make some choices for themselves
  • Demand privileges, but may avoid responsibilities
  • Feel unique; believe that no one else has ever felt the way they do; suffered so much, or been so misunderstood

Intellectual Development

  • Mostly interested in present, limited thoughts of the future
  • Intellectual interests expand
  • Increased ability to de-center and see world from various perspectives
  • Development of ideals and selection of role models
  • May experiment with dangerous risk-taking behaviors
  • Even if students can make abstractions, they learn best when activities are active, hands-on, and related to personal experiences
  • Concerned with rules, standards of behavior and fairness, especially for themselves
  • Do not distinguish between what they are thinking and what others may be thinking; assume that every other person is as concerned with their behavior and appearance as they are; better at planning than carrying out the plan

The Twelve -Year-Old

Physical Development

  • High energy, but much rest needed
  • Growth spurts; girls ahead of boys; wide differences among individuals in rates of development
  • Physical activities and sports valued
  • Eating patterns change, over concern for dieting
  • Feel awkward and may worry about body
  • Increased need for personal hygiene

Social and Emotional Development

  • Struggle with sense of identity
  • Moodiness
  • Can be enthusiastic at some times; lethargic at other times
  • Friendships with both sexes are important
  • Complain that parents interfere with independence
  • More likely to express feelings by actions than words
  • Peer vocabulary (slang) important
  • Less overt affection and attention shown to parents, with occasional rudeness; test limits
  • Impulsive, unaware
  • Experience extremes of emotions
  • Inclusion/exclusion; height of cliques, seek to belong, discovery of telephone
  • Experimenting with behavior, roles, appearance, self-image
  • Difficulty with decisions but need to be able to make some choices for themselves
  • Demand privileges, but may avoid responsibilities
  • Feel unique; believe that no one else has ever felt the way they do; suffered so much, or been so misunderstood

Intellectual Development

  • Hormonal and physical demands of puberty may cause slowing of rate of cognitive development during early adolescence
  • Increased ability to think abstract in intellectual pursuits
  • Learn best when involved in activities that are active, hands-on, and related to real life
  • Concerned with rules, standards of behavior and fairness, especially for themselves
  • Lack of understanding of cause and effect as well as feelings of omnipotence and invulnerability  (”It can’t happen to me.”) can lead to dangerous risk-taking behaviors--smoking, drugs, drinking, etc.
  • Mostly interested in present, limited thoughts of future
  • May show emerging ability in a particular skill or content area
  • Show improved abilities to use speech for self-expression
  • High interest in current events, politics, social justice; also pop culture, materialism
  • More consistent evidence of conscience
  • Idealistic; may offer “ideal” solutions to complex problems
  • Development of ideals and selection of role models
  • May question parents’ political beliefs and other values



“If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail.”

                      Benjamin Franklin

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME AND INTEREST. PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF YOU WOULD LIKE HELP IN LEARNING ABOUT OTHER IMPORTANT TOPICS THAT MAY HELP YOU AND YOUR STUDENT!

HAVE A GREAT SAFE DAY,
MRS. MALONE

Mrs. Linda Malone
Counselor

malonel@swcsd2.org

Mr. Matthew Mikkelsen
Principal
mikkelm@swcsd2.org

Mr. Michael Aimone
Assistant Principal
aimonem@swcsd2.org

Email: malonel@swcsd2.org Phone (307)-872-4455
Fax: (307)-872-4477
 
I am very happily married to John Malone. Rachel and Phil, our daughter and son-in-law, live in Oxford, Mississippi with their daughter Mary Katherine. My two older brothers live in Arkansas. They are both married with one son each. I love animals and affectionately consider our cats as our children.
 
Since 2017-2018, I am honored to serve as Lincoln Middle School Counselor. From 2017- 2013, I proudly served as Green River High School Transition Counselor. From 2013-1999, I enthusiastically served as a Green River High School Guidance Counselor. From 1999-1983, I gladly served as a secondary science teacher.
 
My degrees from Arkansas State University include: an Ed.S for Principalship. MSE Guidance Counselor - Secondary, MS Biology, and a BSE General Science - Biology.
 
I love our students, parents, administrators, faculty, staff, recruiters, and other people who help our students! I love my job and working with students and adults daily.
 
Parents:
      Tips for Success
  • Check your student's planner. Each student is given a free school planner. Monitor assignments daily to ensure they are being written and completed. 
  • Access the school website regularly. Many teachers have class websites that allow parents to monitor daily assignments.
  • Access Infinite Campus to monitor student assignment grade postings.
  • Communicate with your student's teachers. We're all on your student's team.
  • Write down progress report dates in your calendar.
What should I do if my child is not achieving to his/her ability level?
  • Talk to your student. Find out what they are struggling with and what steps they have taken to get help.
  • Talk with the teacher. Ask about what interventions are necessary to improve the student's achievement level in the class.
  • Monitor grades on Infinite Campus and the teacher's website for assignment postings.
  • Provide rewards and consequences for achievement.
 
Transitioning to Middle School:
The transition to middle school can be a scary, exciting, fun and/or challenging time for many students. It is normal for students and parents to feel nervous, excited, anxious or scared. Students are not only making a change to a new school, but they are also going through many physical and emotional changes that accompany adolescence.
 
Lincoln Middle School serves as a transition between elementary school and high school. During this time, we assist your student in learning the academic and independent skills needed to be successful in high school and in life.
How to help your child make a smooth transition:
  • Reassure your child that it is okay to feel nervous.
  • Highlight the positive:
    • More independence
    • New opportunities: more activities, new friends etc.
    • Opportunity to learn new subjects
    • Take a tour of campus over the summer
    • Reassure your child that middle school is a safe place with many caring adults to help
    • If your child is still having difficulty after several weeks, please make an appointment to see your child's counselor, Mrs. Malone.